Join Us For Mission Day! - nationalchurchresidences.blog

Join Us For Mission Day!

At National Church Residences, our mission is to provide high-quality care, services, and residential communities for all seniors. We are motivated by four core values, one of which is mission: “We are driven by a deep sense that our work should serve God and always produce good for others.” This is why Mission Day is so important to our organization.

Although Mission Day is an event, it is a daily attitude motivated by the culture of National Church Residences. Mission Day benefits the residents of National Church Residences by creating fundraising events and service opportunities. Residents, employees, local businesses and the community all participate in Mission Day, whether through attending events at National Church Residences properties or by serving the community through service projects.

Join Us For Mission Day! - nationalchurchresidences.blog

From Detroit to Atlanta and from Columbus to Sacramento, Mission Day fundraising over the past 22 years has made life better for residents in National Church Residences communities – purchasing vans with wheelchair lifts to transport residents where they need to go, adding fitness equipment to keep seniors well, providing workshops and other programming for our residents and much more.

We want you to partner with us and support Mission Day. There are several ways to join us:

Participate in Mission Day activities at your local National Church Residences community

Contact the property manager at your local National Church Residences community and ask about their Mission Day activities. We currently have over 60 properties participating in Mission Day. Although festivities will vary by property, get out to enjoy a variety of fun activities such as games, contests, bake sales, giveaways and more.

Join Us For Mission Day! - nationalchurchresidences.blog

Help supply a need for a community by donating to Mission Day 

You can give directly to the Mission Day fundraising campaign. All contributions support the mission and produce good for the residents. Your gift will make a difference in a community by helping to provide activities and things that enhance their experience. Donate online, or you can mail your payment to National Church Residences Attn: Foundation, 2335 North Bank, Columbus Ohio 43220. Anything you donate helps our seniors remain happy and healthy.

Join Us For Mission Day! - nationalchurchresidences.blog

Invite your friends, family, and colleagues to produce good for others by creating a fundraising campaign

Invite others to do good with you! When you are passionate about the mission like we are, you’ll want to share it with as many people as possible. Crowdfunding allows you to do just that. Creating a crowdfunding campaign enables your goodwill to multiply by your bringing your circle of family, friends, and colleagues into the mission. Set up your page here and spread it like wildfire!

Join Us For Mission Day! - nationalchurchresidences.blog

Share the Mission Day campaign link through an email, text message, or on your social media

Maybe you’re not in a place where you can donate or visit a local community. You can still be a part of and support the mission!  Share this post or the Mission Day campaign link with your friends, family, and colleagues in an email, a text or on your Facebook page. The more people who know about the mission, the more we have an opportunity to support the residents.

Join Us For Mission Day! - nationalchurchresidences.blog

Mission Day is an integral part of what we do at National Church Residences. We couldn’t do everything we do without your support. Join us in our mission to keep seniors home for life. Become a part of Mission Day! 

We want you to be a part of the National Church Residences mission. Feel free to leave a comment, suggest a topic, ask a question, or send an email to communications@nationalchurchresidences.org.

Helping Formerly Homeless Find Employment

One of the main hindrances to the formerly homeless finding success is that they lack the training they need to find and keep employment. Our employees recognized this issue and created the Right Track program.

This program was designed to assist residents of our Permanent Supportive Housing Communities in vocational education training, giving them the tools they need to be successful and gain additional independence. We found that other programs that were offered were too long and didn’t provide the essentials that these residents need to make the proper next steps. Right Track is a five-day program with critical information that changes the lives of those who attend.

In the program, there are three days of work readiness training. In these three days, the trainers teach a variety of hands-on skills including mock interviews, communication skills, financial literacy, and stress management. Residents who successfully complete the training attend a graduation where many of them invite their family and friends to help them celebrate their accomplishment.

After completing the program, the residents are given a four-week training experience where they work directly with our maintenance staff in National Church Residences communities and other community partners, gaining on the job training. These residents enjoy the opportunity to gain work experience and additional money to supplement their social security income. Each resident employee’s caseworker helps them through this process, checking up on them and making sure that they arrive to work on time.

This program has made a difference in the lives of several of our residents. Since the beginning of the program
186 residents enrolled
106 completed supportive employment experience
53% of those who have graduated are employed

This program is making a difference in the lives of those who otherwise would have little to no options. We are proud of this program and look forward to expanding it further.

 

We want you to be a part of the National Church Residences mission. Feel free to leave a comment, suggest a topic, ask a question, or send an email to communications@nationalchurchresidences.org.

Permanent Supportive Housing to experience transition, growth in 2017

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An architect rendering of the Commons at South Cumminsville, a National Church Residences Permanent Supportive Housing community that will break ground in Cincinnati later this year.

By LANCE CRANMER                                                               lcranmer@nationalchurchresidences.org

National Church Residences’ Permanent Supportive Housing portfolio is set to experience both transition and growth in 2017.

With the retirement of Dave Kayuha, the organization’s longtime Chief Administrative Officer who has overseen PSH since its inception in 2003, a plan was put in place to transition the portfolio into Affordable Housing under the direction of Steve Bodkin.

“I’m proud to be part of Permanent Supportive Housing, a mission that serves such a critically vulnerable population,” said Steve, who is the Chief Operating Officer of National Church Residences Housing Division. “I look forward to working with this dedicated, talented, and caring staff to continue driving mission impact.”

Since the Commons at Grant became National Church Residences’ first Permanent Supportive Housing community, the portfolio has expanded to nine PSH communities with a total of 885 units in Columbus, Toledo and Atlanta.

In 2017 the program will expand yet again when Cincinnati’s Commons at South Cumminsville breaks ground.

“Commons at South Cumminsville is the result of a long history of National Church Residences trying to build Permanent Supportive Housing in Cincinnati. It dates back to 2008,” said Amy Rosenthal, National Church Residences Senior Project Leader. “We’ve had our struggles and hiccups, but now we have a home in a community that has welcomed us.”

Commons at South Cumminsville will house 80 PSH units in a building located on Herron Avenue in the northern Cincinnati neighborhood.

“We have a non-profit, Working in Neighborhoods, that has been a great help to us,” Amy said. “Now we have this welcoming community that sees the need for supportive housing in Cincinnati and see that this project will put a positive spotlight on their community, too. They really understand how our supportive housing communities change people’s lives.”

The $15 million new construction project is expected to break ground sometime in late 2017.

New Book Tells Story of Imperial Hotel’s 16-day Occupation

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On June 18, 1990 a group called People for Urban Justice broke into the abandoned Imperial Hotel to hang a sign that said “House the Homeless Here!” The event turned into a 16-day occupation that raised awareness to the plight of Atlanta’s homeless.

 

By LANCE CRANMER                                                               lcranmer@nationalchurchresidences.org

ATLANTA – The banner read, “House the Homeless Here!”

It was a simple act of civil disobedience, meant to draw attention to Atlanta’s lack of housing for the homeless, that turned into a 16-day occupation launching a decades-long movement in Georgia’s capital city.

“Atlanta was razing buildings for sports stadiums and parking lots. Funding was going for glamorous projects instead of affordable housing,” said Terry Easton, author of the new book Raising Our Voices, Breaking the Chain, which chronicles the events surrounding the Imperial Hotel occupation that began on June 18, 1990. “This group, we call them the ‘Imperial Eight,’ they were trying to bring attention to this.”

The eight activists were from a group called People for Urban Justice (PUJ). It was part of a larger organization called Open Door Community, which provided services for the poor and homeless in Atlanta.

“They were trying to bring attention to the lack of affordable housing in Atlanta,” Easton said. “At the time there were an estimated 10,000 homeless people in the city.”

The Imperial Eight broke in to the then-abandoned century-old Imperial Hotel and hung their banner from two of the building’s highest windows in an attempt to draw attention from the media and the mayor’s office.

Today, now known at National Church Residences Commons at Imperial Hotel, the building is a permanent supportive housing site that provides housing for 90 formerly homeless residents of Atlanta.

“I think it’s really wonderful that out of this act of courage and bravery, for these folks to go in and occupy the hotel and actually get something out of it, it’s wonderful,” said Easton. “I think it’s a good lesson for people that sometimes it’s worth the cost.”

To celebrate the release of Raising Our Voices, Breaking the Chain, Easton and two members of the Imperial Eight, Eduard Loring and Murphy Davis, will make an appearance at Commons at Imperial Hotel on Saturday, December 10 from noon to 2 p.m. for a book signing, stories about the occupation and a tour of the beautifully renovated facility.

“(The book) is an authentic, powerful, moving retelling of an epic time in the history of Atlanta when the issue of homelessness was taken to another level because homeless activists and advocates said, ‘enough is enough,’ and occupied the Imperial Hotel,” said Rev. Timothy McDonald III, Pastor at the First Iconium Baptist Church in Atlanta. “This occupation caused the city fathers and business community to rethink how it addressed the issue of homelessness, and, if only for a season, housing the homeless and affordable housing was on the lips of the powerful.”

By the end of the 16-day occupation nearly 300 homeless people had entered the vacant building alongside the activists, and Open Door Community had moved its morning breakfast service inside the hotel.

“Once they were all inside the activists were very clear that they wanted the homeless people to have a voice. The homeless people formed a leadership group and they called themselves the Executive Committee,” Easton said. “They’re the ones that went to the negotiating table at the end of the occupation and negotiated with the City of Atlanta.”

Mayor Maynard Jackson met with the Executive Committee and the members of PUJ to discuss what needed to be done to help the homeless in the community.

“It really forced the mayor and his staff to do something about it,” said Easton. “What PUJ wanted was 5,000 promised units of affordable housing. By the time it ended it was 3,500 that was promised. We’re still not up to that number today. It’s been a slow process, but there has been affordable housing created that has come directly from this. You don’t always get what you want, but something is better than nothing.”

Easton will have copies of his book available for purchase at the Imperial Hotel event Saturday in Atlanta. Those who wish to purchase the book elsewhere can do so for a $10 donation by contacting Easton at Terry.Easton@ung.edu.

Easton is an Associate Professor of English at the University of North Georgia. He was not a member of the Imperial Eight, but was contacted by PUJ document the history of the event.

National Church Residences currently offers more than 1,200 units of affordable senior housing and permanent supportive housing in the Atlanta metro area.

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Terry Easton, author of Raising Our Voices, Breaking the Chain
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National Church Residences Commons at Imperial Hotel today.

Free program helps Permanent Supportive Housing residents train for careers in IT

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Commons at Livingston resident Tyren Thompson graduated from the Per Scholas program in Columbus on March 11. Here he received his certificate and pin from instructor James Miao.

By LANCE CRANMER                                                               lcranmer@nationalchurchresidences.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio — About a year ago Tyren Thompson was facing some tough times.

“I had lost my apartment in May 2015. I was struggling for a little while,” he said. “Then someone suggested I set up an appointment with National Church Residences.”

Tyren, a United States Army veteran, quickly found a new home at Commons at Livingston, National Church Residences’ Permanent Supportive Housing facility in Columbus that is dedicated to providing housing for formerly homeless military veterans.

“They put me in with other veterans and I was thrilled with that,” Tyren said. “It’s been a great experience. They have a lot of services that are offered.”

Among those services available is career training.

Delrita Parks, the Employment Coordinator for National Church Residences Permanent Supportive Housing residents, suggested to Tyren that he enroll in Information Technology classes in a program called Per Scholas.

“Per Scholas is a national nonprofit organization that trains people for life-changing careers at IT professionals,” Delrita said. “The program’s focus is on helping unemployed and underemployed people get a career started in IT, which leads to their A+ certification and assistance in job placement with local companies and IT staffing agencies.”

Tyren graduated the program on March 11, 2016 and participated in the Graduation and Pinning Ceremony at the Per Scholas facility in Columbus.

After graduation he had a moment to reflect on the hard work he put in over the last year.

“I’ve worked very vigorously to get this done,” he said. “Getting up early, studying hard, all of those things.”

In his life, Tyren, who is 32-years old, has always worked hard to overcome adversity. He arrived in Columbus a decade ago from his native Louisiana after being displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

Now that he has graduated, Tyren said his next goal is to land a job in his field.

“Per Scholar benefits our residents because it’s a free program and trains for jobs that exist in a given market based on market data,” Delrita said. “This program is ideal for any resident who has been economically displaced but has the drive and aptitude to succeed in IT. National Church Residences is proud to have graduates from Per Scholas.”

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Deltrita Parks, National Church Residences Employment Coordinator, Tyren Thompson, Sara Perrotta, National Church Residences Case Manager, and Crystal Branch-Parms, National Church Residences Team Leader.